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  Contact : Ph: 03 9707 4452 Email: reception@physiofit.clinic

When to use Ice or Heat … Mark explains in this video

A question regularly asked is “when should I use heat or ice?”…well, as a general rule ice is used with acute/recent injuries and heat can be used with chronic/long-term injuries…

Ice therapy (cryotherapy) can relieve symptoms caused by sprains, strains, bruises and tendinitis – it can virtually be used in any situation in which superficial tissues are inflamed by trauma.  It can also assist in recovery from repetitive strain injuries such as tendinitis, and it works by reducing blow flow to the injured areas, thus reducing inflammation and swelling that causes pain. Ice should be applied immediately after your injury, for 15 minutes every two hours, over the first 48 hours (also keep in mind the RICE rule with acute injuries – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation).

Heat therapy works by improving circulation and blood flow to a particular area due to increased temperature. Increasing the temperature of the afflicted area even slightly can soothe discomfort and increase muscle flexibility. Heat therapy can relax and soothe muscles and heal damaged tissue. Heat can be used before (not after) activities that irritate chronic injuries such as muscle strains and overuse injuries, and can help loosen tissues and relax injured areas. Heat should not be applied for longer than 20 minutes at a time.

Of course, please consult your physiotherapist for professional opinion and management of your injury.

 

 

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Pain. Is it all just in your mind? Professor Lorimer Moseley, Physiotherapist seminar

Pain has been part of the human experience longer than magnetic bracelets, ergonomic chairs, whiplash and repetitive strain injury. Yet it is just in the last few decades that we have realised how terrifically complex pain really is and how wrong many of our assumptions about pain really are.

Pain is an important issue. Its impact on our society is staggering – more Australians suffer from chronic pain than diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer combined. Every day, chronic pain and its management costs Australia almost a million dollars. How can this be?

In this fascinating Knowledge Works lecture, Professor Lorimer Moseley, Physiotherapist at the University of South Australia, will examine two important questions – “Why does it hurt?” and “Why does it still hurt?” He will share findings from his international research investigating the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain disorders.

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Five important tips for Tradies to avoid injuries – Kyle and Kara

Berwick, Beaconsfield,Officer tradies encouraged to watch more than just their backs during Tradies National Health Month

Australian Physiotherapy Association leads the annual Tradies National Health Month during August, 2016

In this next u-tube video featured above, Kyal and Kara provide five important tips for our tradies to ensure they are looking after their bodies on and off the job.

MEDIA RELEASE                                                                                                               

Physiofit Berwick physiotherapists are calling on tradies in Casey and Cardinia to watch more than just their backs during Tradies National Health Month this August. It comes as Australia’s tradies continue to have among the poorest health and safety conditions of workers across all sectors.

The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) leads Tradies National Health Month to educate Australian tradies to keep a check on their safety, health and wellbeing, and to help minimise the risk of serious injury for our labourers, technicians, machinery operators and drivers, amongst other tradie groups.

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Get on board – Tradies National Health Month is August!

Berwick, Beaconsfield,Officer tradies encouraged to watch more than just their backs during Tradies National Health Month

Australian Physiotherapy Association announces annual Tradies National Health Month for August 2016

MEDIA RELEASE                                                                                                               

Physiofit Berwick physiotherapists are calling on tradies in Casey and Cardinia to watch more than just their backs during Tradies National Health Month this August. It comes as Australia’s tradies continue to have among the poorest health and safety conditions of workers across all sectors.

The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) leads Tradies National Health Month to educate Australian tradies to keep a check on their safety, health and wellbeing.

Tradies have among the highest serious injury and disease compensation claims in Australia, according to Safe Work Australia data. Labourers, technicians, and machinery operators and drivers are among the top four occupations when it comes to number of serious injury claims.

The majority of serious claims are from injuries and musculoskeletal disorders, including traumatic joint, ligament, muscle and tendon injuries. While backs still present the highest proportion of body stress injury claims, other body parts affected include upper limbs, lower legs, hips, the abdomen and the pelvic region.

Research also shows tradespersons, labourers and workers across the agricultural and construction industries have high risks of chronic health conditions.

APA physiotherapist Mark Eibl says it is important to remind tradies that their health and safety is a priority.

“This Tradies National Health Month, we want tradies to look after all aspects of their health and wellbeing,” Mark Eibl said. “Everyone—from tradies to their employers, unions and the communities and governments that rely on them—has a role to play in getting our tradies to be proactive about managing and preventing health conditions. It starts with seeking evidence-based treatments like physiotherapy.”

From musculoskeletal support, physiotherapists extend their care into chronic health impacts, like heart disease and diabetes, and the lesser-known pelvic floor issues men face. Physiotherapists are experts in helping to reduce the alarmingly common health and safety issues associated with working in labour intensive industries.

The Block and Reno Rumble favourites Kyal and Kara Demmrich (‘The Super Ks’) will help lead the campaign, using their respective backgrounds of carpenter and physiotherapist to spread the message that health and wellbeing must be tradies’ most important tools (See U tube video below).

For more information visit www.tradieshealth.com.au or www.physiofit.clinic or phone Physiofit on 97074452.

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